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accessibility blog

Content in Context is Caesar

Wrote this a good while ago (November 1 2011!!) but never published it. Since then, a few articles with similar titles have been published. Points still valid.

XKCD always hits the nail on the head. This item was regarding the content on websites and how the publisher often completely misjudges what the client (the end user) actually wants to see.

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accessibility blog

When graphs have no scale

Plenty of more intelligent folks than I have blogged about this topic many times (Forbes, Contrast, etc.) but it doesn’t make the topic of misleading data visualisation any less relevant. Putting aside Fox News, Microsoft and every local newspaper you ever have lain your eyes upon for a moment, 7-eleven.com (an American convenience store/corner shop type affair) have an election related subsite called “7-election” where they’re running some form of poll based on the in-store actions of their customers to gauge support for the two main candidates in the 2012 Presidential Election.The mini-site doesn’t explain how they’re determining results but the red and blue cups might be a clue.

Categories
accessibility blog

O2/Be Broadband SMTP Restrictions

O2 Broadband (the Telefonica rebranding of Be Broadband) has a restriction on its SMTP ports, the only port-25 connection you can use is for the smtp.o2.co.uk server for o2 mail. If you want to use your own email provider such as Google Mail you have to use a different port, so for example use the SSL port 587 for Gmail connections.

Hope that helps someone!

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accessibility learning rant xhtml

Getting around QOL (aka JavaScript execution in Safari)

QOL is Queen’s University Belfast’s student intranet system which allows centralised delivery of lecture content and course material to enrolled students. Unsurprisingly it doesn’t work properly in Safari as it relies heavily on (old school) JavaScript to build page content (not just modify its appearance in a delightfully DOM manner)

node_1 = node.addItem(new TreeNode('node_1','doc.gif','doc.gif','',false,true));
element = node_1.addElement(new elemHyperLink('Student Handbook-2007-08.doc','JavaScript:downloadResource(289314);','','','Student Handbook'));

element = node_1.addElement(new elemText('(92.50 KB)',''));
element = node_1.addElement(new elemImageLink('Download Times', '../images/clock.gif','',0,'top','JavaScript:showDownloadTimes(94720,289314)'));

Yuck. From the image below you can see the Lectures folder has been clicked to fold it out, but due to the JavaScript issue it does not.Queen's Online has some accessibility issues with javascriptYou can see there is an element: JavaScript:downloadResource(289314); in the code which is the type of link behind any given resource. I’ve never noticed this before, but if you extract that link from the page source (Cmd+Alt+U in Safari, Cmd+U in Firefox) and enter it into the Page Address bar, click enter, it will execute the JavaScript right there and download the file to your default location.